Wednesday, April 09, 2014

Wednesday Hero

This post was suggested by Steve

Rear Admiral Eugene Fluckey
Rear Admiral Eugene Fluckey
93 years old from Annapolis, Maryland
October 5, 1913 - June 28, 2007
U.S. Navy

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as commanding officer of the U.S.S. Barb during her 11th war patrol along the east coast of China from 19 December 1944 to 15 February 1945. After sinking a large enemy ammunition ship and damaging additional tonnage during a running 2-hour night battle on 8 January, Comdr. Fluckey, in an exceptional feat of brilliant deduction and bold tracking on 25 January, located a concentration of more than 30 enemy ships in the lower reaches of Nankuan Chiang (Mamkwan Harbor). Fully aware that a safe retirement would necessitate an hour's run at full speed through the uncharted, mined, and rock-obstructed waters, he bravely ordered, "Battle station — torpedoes!" In a daring penetration of the heavy enemy screen, and riding in 5 fathoms [9 m] of water, he launched the Barb's last forward torpedoes at 3,000 yard [2.7 km] range. Quickly bringing the ship's stern tubes to bear, he turned loose 4 more torpedoes into the enemy, obtaining 8 direct hits on 6 of the main targets to explode a large ammunition ship and cause inestimable damage by the resultant flying shells and other pyrotechnics. Clearing the treacherous area at high speed, he brought the Barb through to safety and 4 days later sank a large Japanese freighter to complete a record of heroic combat achievement, reflecting the highest credit upon Comdr. Fluckey, his gallant officers and men, and the U.S. Naval Service.


You can ready more about Rear Admiral Fluckey here


These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.


Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Monday, April 07, 2014

2014 Face of America bike ride and Banners and Friend Riding this year :)

It's that time of year again! April 25-27 will be the 2014 World TEAM Sports Face of America bike ride

Once again this year, my family and I will be collecting banners to hang along the route to cheer the riders on!! We've already received several banners from Madison County primary school !! Thank you!!



Also this year, friend Greta from Hooh Wife & Friends will be riding again !
She and I first met in person at the Face of America bike ride :) So looking forward to cheering her on again as a rider!

Regarding banners..we do have some left from last year's ride and I am Very Late in posting this, but we'll be accepting banners from anyone who can get them here by April 23,2014. 
Instructions for how to make the banners can be found HERE

(you can email me at kasee60 (at) gmail (dot) com for mailing address to send them)




World TEAM Sports Face of America bicycle ride~Instructions for Banner Making




 
Making a banner can be very simple or very elaborate. we will describe the simplest and most inexpensive versions and you can go from there.
 
Materials needed:
ONE light-colored pillow case (e.g., white, yellow, powder blue)
OR

ONE light colored cotton T-shirt (M-XL)

OR
ONE Light colored twin sheet

ONE package of multicolored Sharpie (or any type of) permanent markers (maybe two pkgs if you’re doing a sheet!)

OR

Tubs of tempera paints(a couple bright colors) and paint brushes/sponges, plus permanent markers for folks to sign their names

NOTE: Many fluorescent colors and yellow do not show up well on light colored fabric; select paint/marker colors that have a high contrast with banner fabric.

Optional: Stencils from a craft store to help sketch out the letters in pencil before using the permanent markers or paints (or use stencils to trace and cut out fabric letters)

NO, NOs (please!):

No poles or sticks (hard to transport; all banners will be hung from clothesline or fences, etc)

No paper (gets soggy and tears in rain and morning dew)

No glossy photos (get soggy and tear in rain and morning dew)

Fabric banners are best because they are easiest transport and to secure to ropes and fences with clothes pins or safety pins.
 
With your pens or whatever, decorate your banner with a simple wish, orcheer, or message of thanks or encouragement and then anyone and everyone can sign their name. J 
If your banner will be from a group, I recommend writing the group name along one edge, left or right (across the bottom is less good as that part may drag the ground). Signatures can go all over!

Email me at kasee60 (at) gamil (dot) com if you're interested in donating a banner to cheer the riders along!

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

Wednesday Hero


This post was suggested by  SJ

SSgt. William
Guarnere
SSgt. William Guarnere
 90 years old from Philadelphia, Penn.
 Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division
 April 28, 1923 - March 8, 2014

  U.S.
Army

SSgt. William "Wild Bill" Guarnere passed away three weeks ago at the age of 90. SSgt. Guarnere was part of Easy Company, made famous by the HBO mini-series "Band Of Brothers". 

 During his three years of service, SSgt. Guarnere saw action throughout Europe, including being part of the invasion of Normandy on D-Day. He was awarded the Silver and Bronze stars, the Purple Heart and the French LiberationMedal.

You can read more about SSgt. Guarnere  here and  here 


 These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. 

 Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

 This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go  here.

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Sunday, March 30, 2014

Anysoldier.com Fundraiser

Maj.Pain at One Marine's View passes on the word about the Anysoldier.com Fundraiser

If you've never checked out Anysoldier.com , they are a wonderful support for the troops..they've been around since 2003. and they hook up folks who want to support the troops with deployed troops who want to be supported (to put it most simply :)

You can find out more about the fundraiser here


Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Wednesday Hero


This post was suggested by Michael

Lt. Milton Ricketts
Lt. Milton Ricketts
 28 years old from Baltimore, Maryland 
 USS Yorktown (CV-5)
 August 5, 1913 - May 8, 1942

  U.S.
Navy

For extraordinary and distinguished gallantry above and beyond the call of duty as Officer-in-Charge of the Engineering Repair Party of the U.S.S. Yorktown in action against enemy Japanese forces in the Battle of the Coral Sea on 8 May 1942. During the severe bombarding of the Yorktown by enemy Japanese forces, an aerial bomb passed through and exploded directly beneath the compartment in which Lt. Ricketts' battle station was located, killing, wounding or stunning all of his men and mortally wounding him. Despite his ebbing strength, Lt. Ricketts promptly opened the valve of a near-by fireplug, partially led out the fire hose and directed a heavy stream of water into the fire before dropping dead beside the hose. His courageous action, which undoubtedly prevented the rapid spread of fire to serious proportions, and his unflinching devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
You can read more here


 These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

 Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

 This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go  here.

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Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Wednesday Hero


This post was suggested by  Sarah

U.S.
Army


Yesterday marked the end of a 12-year review by the Pentagon when 24 soldiers from WWII to Vietnam, who were denied the award they earned, finally received their Medals Of Honor.

 Spc. 4 Santiago J. Erevia
 Staff Sgt. Melvin Morris
 Sgt. 1st Class Jose Rodela
 Sgt. Candelario Garcia
 Spc. 4 Leonard L. Alvarado 
 Staff Sgt. Felix M. Conde-Falcon
 Spc. 4 Ardie R. Copas 
 Spc. 4 Jesus S. Duran
 Cpl. Joe R. Baldonado
 Cpl. Victor H. Espinoza
 Sgt. Eduardo C. Gomez
 Pfc. Leonard M. Kravitz
 Master Sgt. Juan E. Negron
 Master Sgt. Mike C. Pena
 Pvt. Demensio Rivera
 Pvt. Miguel A. Vera 
 Sgt. Jack Weinstein
 Private Pedro Cano 
 Pvt. Joe Gandara
 Pfc. Salvador J. Lara
 Sgt. William F. Leonard
 Staff Sgt. Manuel V. Mendoza
 Sgt. Alfred B. Nietzel
 1st Lt. Donald K. Schwab

You can find more information here

 These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

 Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

 This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go  here.

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Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Wednesday Hero


This post was suggested by Michael

Cmdr. Ernest Edwin
Evans
Cmdr. Ernest Edwin Evans
 36 years old from Pawnee, Oklahoma 
 Commanding Officer USS Johnson (DD 557) August 13, 1908 - October 25, 1944 
  U.S.
Navy 
 For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as commanding officer of the U.S.S. Johnston in action against major units of the enemy Japanese fleet during the battle off Samar on 25 October 1944. The first to lay a smokescreen and to open fire as an enemy task force, vastly superior in number, firepower and armor, rapidly approached. Comdr. Evans gallantly diverted the powerful blasts of hostile guns from the lightly armed and armored carriers under his protection, launching the first torpedo attack when the Johnston came under straddling Japanese shellfire. Undaunted by damage sustained under the terrific volume of fire, he unhesitatingly joined others of his group to provide fire support during subsequent torpedo attacks against the Japanese and, outshooting and outmaneuvering the enemy as he consistently interposed his vessel between the hostile fleet units and our carriers despite the crippling loss of engine power and communications with steering aft, shifted command to the fantail, shouted steering orders through an open hatch to men turning the rudder by hand and battled furiously until the Johnston, burning and shuddering from a mortal blow, lay dead in the water after 3 hours of fierce combat. Seriously wounded early in the engagement, Comdr. Evans, by his indomitable courage and brilliant professional skill, aided materially in turning back the enemy during a critical phase of the action. His valiant fighting spirit throughout this historic battle will venture as an inspiration to all who served with him.

You can read more about Commander Evans   here and  here 

 These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

 Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

 This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go  here.


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