Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Wednesday Hero


SSgt. Michael Pate

SSgt. Michael Pate
 31 years old from Austin, Texas 
 Civil Affairs Team 611

  U.S. Army

From SSgt. Pate's Silver Star citation:

 The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Michael P. Pate, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in connection with military operations against the enemy. Staff Sergeant Pate heroically distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous conduct in the face of the enemy of the United States as Medical Sergeant, Civil Affairs Team 611, Special Operations Task Force-Southeast, Village Stability Platform Shobar, Afghanistan, in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM. On the afternoon of November 1, 2012, while conducting a routine civil reconnaissance patrol, Sergeant Pates' patrol came under small-arms and automatic weapons fire in an ambush east of the village of Sardar Kala, Afghanistan. The entire patrol was heading east, stretched out over a 400 meter distance and was caught in a freshly plowed farmer's field that gently sloped upward. The only cover or concealment came in the form of ankle high irrigation berms. Sergeant Pate's element 4 was the western most squad and was 175 meters from 2 fortified heavy machine gun positions and at least 6 additional enemy shooters who used a dense orchard village which provided multiple egress routes, and also contained a large number of civilians in the area. The trail man in element 4 also carried the heavy weapon system and was critically wounded when a bullet from the initial burst struck him in the back. The enemy machine-gunners concentrated fire on the element 4 members. Sergeant Pate realized the necessity to immediately neutralize the enemy threat and render aid to his wounded teammate, so he risked his own life to run over 50 meters back toward the enemy fighting positions. While the other members of element four were pinned down and returning fire, Sergeant Pate and his team leader, Captain Jacob Allen, chose to run through heavy and effective fire to their teammates position, and dragged the wounded teammate over 25 meters to the only cover available in the form of a 6 inch retaining berm, while continuing to return fire on the enemy position. Sergeant Pate performed flawlessly under heavy enemy fire, performing surgical interventions without cover or concealment while simultaneously returning effective fire for more than 10 minutes. He remained exposed while hundreds of enemy bullets impacted all around them in order to coordinate with his Joint Terminal Attack Controller for close air support and MEDEVAC, and to update the ground force commander with enemy position information so the other elements could maneuver to, close with, and terminate two enemy fighters. His actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of military heroism and reflect distinct credit upon himself,Army. 

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so that we may get to enjoy our freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero

. Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

 Wounded Warrior Project - Because So Many Have Come Back With Injuries, Seen And Unseen

 This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go  here.


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Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Veteran's Day 2014

Thank you, to all the veterans out there !



and a special Thank You to those veterans in my family

My Dad



                                             My  Aunt Lynn

                                           


and my husband



Wednesday, November 05, 2014

Wednesday Hero


1st. Lt. Loren Hagen

1st. Lt. Loren Hagen
 24 years old from Fargo, North Dakota
 U.S. Army Training Advisory Group
 February 25, 1946 - August 7, 1971

  U.S. Army

From 1st. Lt. Hagen's Medal Of Honor citation: T

he President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pride in presenting the Medal of Honor (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant Loren Douglas Hagen, United States Army (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as the team leader of a small reconnaissance team with the U.S. Army Training Advisory Group, in action against enemy aggressor forces while operating deep within enemy-held territory in the Republic of Vietnam, on 7 August 1971. At approximately 0630 hours on the morning of 7 August 1971 the small team came under a fierce assault by a superior-sized enemy force using heavy small arms, automatic weapons, mortar, and rocket fire. First Lieutenant Hagen immediately began returning small-arms fire upon the attackers and successfully led this team in repelling the first enemy onslaught. He then quickly deployed his men into more strategic defense locations before the enemy struck again in an attempt to overrun and annihilate the beleaguered team's members. First Lieutenant Hagen repeatedly exposed himself to- the enemy fire directed at him as he constantly moved about the team's perimeter, directing fire, rallying the members, and resupplying the team with ammunition, while courageously returning small arms and hand grenade fire in a valorous attempt to repel the advancing enemy force. The courageous actions and expert leadership abilities of First Lieutenant Hagen were a great source of inspiration and instilled confidence in the team members. After observing an enemy rocket make a direct hit on and destroy one of the team's bunkers, First Lieutenant Hagen moved toward the wrecked bunker in search for team members despite the fact that the enemy force now controlled the bunker area. With total disregard for his own personal safety, he crawled through the enemy fire while returning small-arms fire upon the enemy force. Undaunted by the enemy rockets and grenades impacting all around him, First Lieutenant Hagen desperately advanced upon the destroyed bunker until he was fatally wounded by enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire. With complete disregard for his personal safety, First Lieutenant Hagen's courageous gallantry, extraordinary heroism, and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty, at the cost of his own life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon him and the United States Army.

You can read more about 1st. Lt. Hagen here 

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so that we may get to enjoy our freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

 Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

 Wounded Warrior Project - Because So Many Have Come Back With Injuries, Seen And Unseen

 This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go  here.

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Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Wednesday Hero


This post was suggested by Michael

Cpt. Joseph O'Callahan

Cpt. Joseph O'Callahan
 58 years old from Worcester, Mass 
 Naval Reserve Chaplain Corps, USS Franklin
 May 14, 1905 - March 18, 1964

  U.S. Navy 

 From Cpt. O'Callahan's Medal Of Honor citation: 

 For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as chaplain on board the U.S.S. Franklin when that vessel was fiercely attacked by enemy Japanese aircraft during offensive operations near Kobe, Japan, on 19 March 1945. A valiant and forceful leader, calmly braving the perilous barriers of flame and twisted metal to aid his men and his ship, Lt. Comdr. O'Callahan groped his way through smoke-filled corridors to the shells, rockets, and other armament. With the ship rocked by incessant explosions, with debris and fragments raining down and fires raging in ever-increasing fury, he ministered to the wounded and dying, comforting and encouraging men of all faiths; he organized and led firefighting crews into the blazing inferno on the flight deck; he directed the jettisoning of live ammunition and the flooding of the magazine; he manned a hose to cool hot, armed bombs rolling dangerously on the listing deck, continuing his efforts, despite searing, suffocating smoke which forced men to fall back gasping and imperiled others who replaced them. Serving with courage, fortitude, and deep spiritual strength, Lt. Comdr. O'Callahan.

You can read more about Cpt. O'Callahan  here


 These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so that we may get to enjoy our freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

 Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

 Wounded Warrior Project - Because So Many Have Come Back With Injuries, Seen And Unseen

 This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Wednesday Hero


This post was suggested by Michael

Maj. Charles Watters
Maj. Charles Watter
s 40 years old from Jersey City, New Jersey 
 Army Chaplain Corps, 173rd Support Battalion
 January 17, 1927 - November 19, 1967

  U.S. Army

From Maj. Watters's Medal Of Honor citation: 

 For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Chaplain Watters distinguished himself during an assault in the vicinity of Dak To. Chaplain Watters was moving with one of the companies when it engaged a heavily armed enemy battalion. As the battle raged and the casualties mounted, Chaplain Watters, with complete disregard for his safety, rushed forward to the line of contact. Unarmed and completely exposed, he moved among, as well as in front of the advancing troops, giving aid to the wounded, assisting in their evacuation, giving words of encouragement, and administering the last rites to the dying. When a wounded paratrooper was standing in shock in front of the assaulting forces, Chaplain Watters ran forward, picked the man up on his shoulders and carried him to safety. As the troopers battled to the first enemy entrenchment, Chaplain Watters ran through the intense enemy fire to the front of the entrenchment to aid a fallen comrade. A short time later, the paratroopers pulled back in preparation for a second assault. Chaplain Watters exposed himself to both friendly and enemy fire between the two forces in order to recover two wounded soldiers. Later, when the battalion was forced to pull back into a perimeter, Chaplain Watters noticed that several wounded soldiers were lying outside the newly formed perimeter. Without hesitation and ignoring attempts to restrain him, Chaplain Watters left the perimeter three times in the face of small arms, automatic weapons, and mortar fire to carry and to assist the injured troopers to safety. Satisfied that all of the wounded were inside the perimeter, he began aiding the medics ... applying field bandages to open wounds, obtaining and serving food and water, giving spiritual and mental strength and comfort. During his ministering, he moved out to the perimeter from position to position redistributing food and water, and tending to the needs of his men. Chaplain Watters was giving aid to the wounded when he himself was mortally wounded. Chaplain Watters' unyielding perseverance and selfless devotion to his comrades was in keeping with the highest traditions of the U.S. Army.

You can read more about Maj. Charles Watters  here 


 These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so that we may get to enjoy our freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero. 

 Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

 Wounded Warrior Project - Because So Many Have Come Back With Injuries, Seen And Unseen

 This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go  here. 

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Monday, October 20, 2014

No, You CANNOT send Christmas Cards to "A Recovering Wounded Soldier"..so, how Can I send cards?

Sigh, I've already seen it starting, posts on Facebook and around the web suggesting that we send cards to 'A recovering wounded soldier' at 'Water Reed Army Medical center'.

And you CanNot do that,

A. because 'Walter Reed Army Medical Center' no longer Exists..
In 2011, Walter Reed and the Bethesda National Naval Medical Center Closed, and the

WALTER REED NATIONAL MILITARY MEDICAL CENTER

opened.

and B . You have Never been able to send cards to just "A Recovering Wounded Soldier'.

This is just a fallacious meme that started years ago, and won't seem to disappear, and it's a huge cause of a great many contributions to dead letter piles....all those cards sent over the years to "a recovering wounded soldier' just ended up being discarded, and never benefitted anyone. Cards had to be specifically addressed to a person, or an organization, in order to be delivered.

So..How Can You Send Cards?

In years past, the American Red Cross had a national program called 'Holiday Mail for Heroes'

BUT, this year (2014) that program is changing...there wil No Longer Be a National Address to send Holiday cards to via the Red Cross

However, as you can see here on the

American Red Cross Holiday Mail for Heroes  link,

 Red Cross chapters across the continental U.S. and Red Cross offices on military installations overseas will take complete control of the program.

Moving forward, local Red Cross offices will collect, sort, and distributing the holiday cards using an events-based approach in their local communities.

You can visit the link above to see how to contact your local Red Cross chapter to see if they are participating.

I'm posting this information because I hope if we spread the word we can

SAVE A CARD AND STOP THE FALSE MEME!

Spread the word, won't you? 

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Wednesday Hero


This post was suggested by  SJ

George H. Kirk, Sr.
George H. Kirk, Sr.
 82 years old
 3rd Marine Division 
 May 25, 1917 - October 28, 1999
  
 George Kirk, Sr. was a Marine and a Navajo Code Talker who passed away in 1999. Recently his uniform was set to go up for auction but thankfully Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly heard about it and was able to get it returned to the tribe.

You can read more about this story  here 

 These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so that we may get to enjoy our freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

 Those Who Say That We're In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don't Know Where To Look

 Wounded Warrior Project - Because So Many Have Come Back With Injuries, Seen And Unseen

 This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go  here.

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